Ben Norris

Jocko

Jocko Willink

Jocko Willink is a retired Navy SEAL, and a leadership consultant, podcaster, and author (see Wikipedia).

Listening to his books or podcasts is one of my most frequently assigned pieces of homework from my therapist. He has a way of cutting through to the heart of an issue, and speaking the truth that my mind needs to hear. I highly recommend learning more about him.

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🎧🎙️ Mind mechanics

This is such a great analogy. Jocko talks about how he started to understand mental health as he first talked with Jordan Peterson.

The mind is like a car, and psychologists or therapists are like mind mechanics who can help when the mind breaks down.

🎧🎙️ Start walking

Right after I posted some clips from a Jocko Underground podcast, a new episode came out. I loved the analogy Jocko gave of being stuck in a forest and needing to start walking to figure out where you are and where to go.

He summed it up so well: “You’re not going to be able to do anything until you do something.”

🎧🎙️ A good person

Jocko’s sense of humor cracks me up. It’s fun when he breaks a little and laughs at what he’s saying. This clip is him talking about the children’s books he’s written.

🎧🎙️ Your kid is five

This answer from Jocko is one of my favorites. Whenever I catch myself getting too serious about something, I hear his big sigh.

Bro, your kid is five…

🎧🎙️ Emotions are part of the calculus

A recurring theme in my writing is acknowledging and allowing emotions. It can be so easy to swing between the extremes or being ruled by emotions, and disallowing and discounting them completely. I loved this clip from Jocko about finding the middle ground, and respecting emotions while not allowing them to take over.

🎧🎙️ Building discipline

Lately I have been binging old Jocko episodes. I loved his response to this question: “What is a step-by-step guide for building discipline for someone who has little to none of it?”

Even more helpful for me was the answer to a question he posed as a follow-up: “Will the discipline get easier over time?”

It doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter if it’s easy or hard. You don’t think about it. You don’t consider that. Just do what you are supposed to do.

For someone who often gets stuck in my head about things, this kind of approach is great.

Stop thinking about it, and just do it.

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